State SAT Scores 2009

The College Board released today the 2009 SAT Scores by State.  They strongly encourage people to look at the data stand alone yet it seems everyone wants to see the SAT Rankings by State. We picked them up from a variety of news sources and present them to you with caution.  Some states have low participation rates and arguably can tilt the field.  We will follow up with some analysis in a future post.  Also see our post Does Increased Spending on Higher Education lead to Better State University Rankings?

Top SAT State Scores include Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Missouri.  These States primarily have their students take the ACT test so their numbers may not be representative of the entire state.

The Worst States for SAT Scores include Maine, Hawaii, South Carolina, Georgia and New YorkDC is also very low.
Here is the ranking of SAT Scores by State List:

2009 State Sat Scores

             
    Rate Reading Math Writing Total
1 Iowa 3% 610 615 588 1813
2 Wisconsin 5% 594 608 582 1784
3 Minnesota 7% 595 609 578 1782
4 Missouri 5% 595 600 584 1779
5 Illinois 6% 588 604 583 1775
6 Michigan 5% 584 603 575 1762
7 South Dakota 3% 589 600 569 1758
8 Nebraska 4% 587 594 572 1753
9 North Dakota 3% 590 593 566 1749
10 Kansas 7% 581 589 564 1734
11 Kentucky 7% 573 573 561 1707
12 Oklahoma 5% 575 571 557 1703
13 Tennessee 10% 571 565 565 1701
14 Arkansas 5% 572 572 556 1700
15 Colorado 20% 568 575 555 1698
16 Wyoming 5% 567 568 550 1685
17 Mississippi 4% 567 554 559 1680
18 Louisiana 7% 563 558 555 1676
19 Alabama 7% 557 552 549 1658
20 Utah 6% 559 558 540 1657
21 New Mexico 11% 553 546 534 1633
22 Ohio 22% 537 546 523 1606
23 Montana 22% 541 542 519 1602
24 Idaho 18% 541 540 520 1601
25 Washington 53% 524 531 507 1563
26 New Hampshire 75% 523 523 510 1557
27 Massachusetts 84% 514 526 510 1551
28 Oregon 52% 523 525 499 1548
29 Vermont 64% 518 518 506 1543
30 Connecticut 83% 509 513 512 1535
31 Arizona 26% 516 521 497 1534
32 Alaska 46% 520 516 492 1528
33 Virginia 68% 511 512 498 1522
34 California 49% 500 513 498 1511
35 West Virginia 18% 511 501 499 1511
36 New Jersey 76% 496 513 496 1506
37 Maryland 69% 500 502 495 1498
38 Rhode Island 66% 498 496 494 1489
39 North Carolina 63% 495 511 480 1487
40 Nevada 42% 501 505 479 1485
41 Indiana 63% 496 507 480 1484
42 Delaware 71% 495 498 484 1478
43 Pennsylvania 71% 493 501 483 1478
44 Florida 59% 497 498 480 1476
45 Texas 51% 486 506 475 1468
46 New York 85% 485 502 478 1466
47 Georgia 71% 490 491 479 1461
48 South Carolina 67% 486 496 470 1453
49 Hawaii 58% 479 502 469 1451
50 Maine 90% 468 467 455 1391
51 DC 79% 466 451 461 1379
  All Students 46% 501 515 493 1509
Source: College Board and various news services Rate: Student Population Rate as reported by www.collegeboard.com

 

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Comments

  • 7/22/2010 7:00 PM Charles Carleton wrote:
    This list is useless.

    Did you notice that all the top ten states on that list are from the Northern Midwest? That's because the typical students in midwestern places like Iowa and Wisconsin don't take the SAT, they take the other admissions test (the ACT). The only kids in Iowa who take the SAT are the ones who plan to apply out of state, to Ivy league schools. Naturally, those kids score high.

    Meanwhile, in places like Connecticut or Vermont or New Jersey or California, the ACT is not given, and everyone (including the morons) takes the SAT even if they only plan to go to community college.

    This ranking almost entirely correlates with the percentage of the students who take the ACT versus the SAT, nothing more. It's horribly misleading.
    Reply to this
    1. 3/29/2012 12:32 PM Mag wrote:
      The ACT is actually harder I am 54 and took. Both
      Reply to this
      1. 11/28/2012 12:25 AM Dan wrote:
        The difficulty of both of these tests is largely subjective. Many students excel on either the SAT or ACT, but do worse on the other even though they are similar in content. The formatting is likely what causes the discrepancy.
        Reply to this
  • 7/23/2010 9:55 AM Todd wrote:
    Why do other states use textbooks designed to Texas standards? With scores like that -- I'd think Texas would be close to the last state I'd want designing my kid's educational materials.
    Reply to this
    1. 2/22/2011 1:46 PM Eli Wiggs wrote:
      It's pure economics: Texas is large and populous so it orders so many text books that it can dictate the content. Smaller, less populous have to buy what's available. Unfortunately, The Texas Board is packed with ideologues and not educators.
      Reply to this
  • 7/26/2010 3:29 PM Eytan Bernstein wrote:
    This is not at all a representative set of statistics. By my count, there were 10 states that had a rate of 70% or more. We could even extend it to the states with 50% or more. But I would certainly not count any state with less than 50% of its students taking this test. If you notice, all of the top states had the lowest number of takers and all of the bottom states had the highest rates. Massachusetts should probably be ranked highest for having one of the highest ratios of takers to scorers.
    Reply to this
  • 9/11/2010 3:59 AM Vitun wrote:
    Kindly allow me to add one question:

    How to educate those "minority" kids "better" ?

    Eliminate standards totally & then proceed to define everyone as equal a
    priority and by definition. E.g. when the SAT doesn't produce equal
    outcome, it is a racist test. When groups average different on IQ tests
    intelligence is therefore merely some social construct and doesn't exist
    etc etc.

    From a practical point though the best cure is still prevention.
    Reply to this
  • 9/21/2010 7:40 PM Missouri Mom CA raised wrote:
    While I will agree that this list present the "numbers" in a skewed fashion (don't all numbers? - the answer to that is yes, I was a math major, I should know).

    However, it's a typically elitist (and coastal) comment to insinuate that ACT test takers are morons, and that community college bound kids are less than smart. We ended up in Missouri from more progressive and (we thought) more educationally centered communities. We were quite happy to be proven wrong. Missouri has some excellent educational districts (not KCMO of course) but plenty of awesome things are going on in the state. Our own college bound child took both the SAT & the ACT, did quite well on both and is a junior on a full tuition scholarship at Missouri, majoring in Journalism (top J school in the nation, thank you very much). Meanwhile, some friends of this child went to community colleges after doing well on the SAT and/or ACT, not because they had to attend the local college, and obviously not because they were lacking in big campus smarts, but rather because the central Midwest is a very practical sort of area and their parents don't believe in BIG debt.

    Stop looking down your nose, get out and live a little. Never ceases to amaze me, how "worldly" people think themselves to be, while knowing so little about their own world (i.e. country).
    Reply to this
  • 11/16/2010 9:58 PM KellyWayne wrote:
    The reason that Texas drives the textbook market has nothing to do with academics. The Texas is typically the largest buyer of textbooks and either the publishers tailor their books to make sure that they adhere to Texas' curriculum standards or they won't be able to sell them in Texas. S
    Reply to this
  • 2/10/2011 2:05 PM mother of pearl pendant wrote:
    This is not at all a representative set of statistics. By my count, there were 10 states that had a rate of 70% or more. We could even extend it to the states with 50% or more. But I would certainly not count any state with less than 50% of its students taking this test. If you notice, all of the top states had the lowest number of takers and all of the bottom states had the highest rates. Massachusetts should probably be ranked highest for having one of the highest ratios of takers to scorers.
    Reply to this
  • 2/17/2011 12:58 PM TC wrote:
    When I did my own manual ranking they do not match the rankings above. I used statistics available here: http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d09/tables/dt09_146.asp
    How do you contact someone at this site to find out why the difference???
    Reply to this
  • 3/10/2011 8:03 PM Nikky wrote:
    "E.g. when the SAT doesn't produce equal
    outcome, it is a racist test. When groups average different on IQ tests
    intelligence is therefore merely some social construct and doesn't exist
    etc etc."

    @vitun: Socioeconomic inequality falls on a racial line, and socioeconomic status is the strongest predictor of standardized test scores. Therefore, you cannot conclude that the ACT/SAT are racist. That said, according to FairTest, even when background is controlled for race there is some inequity along racial lines-- it is not huge, but it may indicate bias of the test.

    I think a stronger case to make than that the tests are racist is whether they truly mean anything. A GPA is a better predictor of future college success than test scores, even between schools.
    Reply to this
  • 1/16/2012 7:57 AM Tadacip 20 wrote:
    I really appreciate your professional approach. These are pieces of very useful information that will be of great use for me in future. Thanks for it.
    Reply to this
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